Introduction


Robert Earl Burton founded The Fellowship of Friends in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1970.

Burton modeled his own group after that of Alex Horn, loosely borrowing from the Fourth Way teachings of Gurdjieff and Ouspensky. In recent years, the Fellowship has cast its net more broadly, embracing any spiritual tradition that includes (or can be interpreted to include) the notion of "presence."

The Fellowship of Friends exhibits the hallmarks of a "doomsday religious cult," wherein Burton exercises absolute authority, and demands loyalty and obedience. He warns that his is the only path to consciousness and eternal life. Invoking his gift of prophecy, he has over the years prepared his flock for great calamities (e.g. a depression in 1984, the fall of California in 1998, nuclear holocaust in 2006, and an ominous, yet unspecified new threat late in 2018.) While non-believers shall perish, through the direct intervention and guidance from 44 angels (including his divine father, Leonardo da Vinci) Burton and his followers will be spared, founding a new, and more perfect civilization.

Many regard Robert Earl Burton a narcissist and sociopath, surrounded by a largely greed- and power-driven inner circle. The following pages offer abundant evidence supporting that conclusion.

This archive draws
on official Fellowship publications and websites,
news archives, court documents, cult education and awareness forums, the (former) Fellowship Wikipedia page, the long-running Fellowship of Friends - Living Presence Discussion, the Internet Archive, the (former) Fellowship of Friends wiki project, and the editor's own 13-year experience in the Fellowship.

Presented in a reverse chronology, the Fellowship's history may be navigated via the "Blog Archive" located in the sidebar below.

Saturday, September 9, 2006

Robert Burton humiliated by Higher Forces' failure to trigger World War III

[ed. - For decades, Robert Burton has been preparing his followers for this event. This was to be the really big one, Armageddon, a nuclear holocaust, with Burton and his followers safely sheltered inside the Fellowship's winery bunker. One can only imagine his disappointment that the vast sea of sleeping humanity will survive to see another day. See also, "Our ark will be composed of ten thousand people in the year 2006, and then the doors will close." NOTE: The wikispaces Fellowship of Friends page linked below is no longer fully accessible, as the site subscription has expired. It's possible it will be reinstated in the future.]

"Ollie" wrote on the Fellowship of Friends Discussion blog, May 17, 2008:
Dozens of things Robert Burton had to say during the 1980s about the nuclear holocaust he predicted for September 2006 (and the role the Fellowship of Friends would have in building a new civilization after crawling out of the fallout shelter) can be found at

http://fellowshipoffriends.wikispaces.com/in-their-own-words

(scroll down to the bottom half of the page)

It makes for a sickening read, I guess so much is fair to say.

Don’t say this was then but now is now. Even with all the six and four talk of sequence and wordless breaths Robert Burton hasn’t let go of the idea that Armageddon is just around the corner and that all good students will be saved from destruction, huddled together in a fallout shelter (yes, the winery). Never mind that 2006 has come and gone. Influence C has informed Robert that it’s coming, so he must stick to it, although more privately. It has simply been postponed to 2011 [actually 2012], in tune with the Mayan calendar. He has a curious and strange attraction for large disasters (earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, fires, terror attacks, “hydrogen warfare” etc.) and has always liked to suddenly rouse emotions at his events by talking about any such disaster.

I remember, as recently as 15 months ago, after an overcrowded teaching event, he mentioned to a small group of students that it “might have been preparation for when we all live together in a nuclear fallout shelter”.

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